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Keynote Lectures

Deeply Subwavelength Layered Metamaterials: From Hyperbolic Dispersion Metasurfaces to Fano Resonance Optical Coatings
Giuseppe Strangi, Case Western Reserve University, United States, and CNR-NANOTEC Istituto di Nanotecnologia and Department of Physics, University of Calabria, Italy

Nanophotonics: An Enabling Tool for Basic Research and Technology
Romain Quidant, ETH Zürich, Switzerland

Electro-Optic Metal-Oxides for Miniaturised Telecom and Sensing Devices
Rachel Grange, ETH Zurich, Department of Physics, Institute for Quantum Electronics, Optical Nanomaterial Group, Switzerland

Topological Plasmonics: Ultrafast Vector Movies of Plasmonic Skyrmions on the Nanoscale
Harald Giessen, 4. Physikalisches Institut, University of Stuttgart, Germany

 

Deeply Subwavelength Layered Metamaterials: From Hyperbolic Dispersion Metasurfaces to Fano Resonance Optical Coatings

Giuseppe Strangi
Case Western Reserve University, United States, and CNR-NANOTEC Istituto di Nanotecnologia and Department of Physics, University of Calabria
Italy
 

Brief Bio
Giuseppe Strangi (http://physics.case.edu/faculty/giuseppe-strangi/) is Professor of Physics and Ohio Research Scholar in Surfaces of Advanced Materials at Case Western Reserve University. He leads the Nanoplasm Labs (http://nanoplasm.case.edu) at CWRU Cleveland, and he is research director of the National Research Council (CNR- Italy). Strangi is the President of the Scientific Committee of the Foundation “Con il Cuore”, a national foundation that supports cancer research in Europe and he is the General Chair of the International Conference – NANOPLASM “New Frontiers in Plasmonics and Nanophotonics”. Strangi research interests include condensed matter physics, nano-photonics and plasmonics of electromagnetic materials and cancer nanotechnology. He is fellow of The Institute of Science of the Origins, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center (CWRU) and Fellow of Optical Society of America (OSA).


Abstract

In recent years a wide interest has been spurred by the inverse design of artificial layered heterostructures for nano-biophotonic applications. In particular, the extreme optical properties of artificial hyperbolic dispersion nanomaterials allowed to access new physical effects and mechanisms. The unbound isofrequency surfaces of hyperbolic metamaterials and metasurfaces allow to access virtually infinite photonic density of states, ultrahigh confinement of electromagnetic fields and anomalous wave propagation. Similarly, by layering metal-dielectric thin films is possible to obtain a type of optical coatings that exhibit photonic Fano resonance, or a Fano-resonant optical coating (FROC). We expand the coupled mechanical oscillator description of Fano resonance to thin-film nanocavities. We observed that semi-transparent FROCs can transmit and reflect the same color as a beam splitter filter, a property that cannot be realized through conventional optical coatings. Here, we present the physics of different deeply subwavelength layered heterostructures and how they allow to control light-matter interaction at the single nanometer scale, including within living systems.

REFERENCES
[1] K. V. Sreekanth, Antonio De Luca & Giuseppe Strangi   "Experimental demonstration of surface and bulk plasmon polaritons in hypergratings” Scientific Reports 3, 03291 (2013)
[2] K. V. Sreekanth, Y. Alapan, M. ElKabbash, U. A. Gurkan, E. Ilker, M. Hinczevski, A. De Luca and G. Strangi Nature Materials 15, 4 4609 (2016)
[3] ElKabbash, M., Letsou, T., Jalil, S.A. Hoffman N., Lininger A., Hinczewski M. et.al & G. Strangi. “Fano-resonant ultrathin film optical coatings”. Nature Nanotechnology (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41565-020-00841-9



 

 

Nanophotonics: An Enabling Tool for Basic Research and Technology

Romain Quidant
ETH Zürich
Switzerland
 

Brief Bio
Quidant received a PhD in Physics (2002) from the University of Dijon, in France. Right after defending his thesis, he joined ICFO as a postdoctoral researcher. This was the year of its creation and he got actively involved into the early developments of the Institute. In 2006, he was appointed junior Professor (tenure-track) and group leader of the Plasmon NanoOptics group at ICFO. In 2009, he became tenure Professor both at ICFO and ICREA (Catalan Institution for Research). After nearly 18 years at ICFO, in June 2020, he joined the Mechanical and Process Engineering department (D-MAVT) at ETH Zurich. Quidant is recipient of 5 ERC grants (StG2010, PoC2011, PoC2015, CoG2015 and SyG2021) and several international and national prizes (Fresnel2009, City of Barcelona 2010, International Commission for Optics 2012, National research Prize 2014, Banc Sabadell 2017). He also serves as the executive editor of ACSPhotonics (American Chemical Society).

The research of the Quidant’s group focuses on nano-optics, at the interface between Photonics and Nanotechnology. His team uexploits the unique optical properties of nanostructures as an enabling toolbox to design solutions to scientific and technological challenges, in a wide set of disciplines, from fundamental physics to biotechnology and medicine. This makes his research highly interdisciplinary and involved in both basic and applied research. The most fundamental part of its work is mainly directed towards enhanced light/matter interaction and optomechanics. From a more applied viewpoint, his team investigates news strategies to control light and heat at the nanometer scale for biomedical applications, including lab-on-a-chip technology and targeted hyperthermia and for reconfigurable planar optics.


Abstract
Twenty years of extensive research in the field of nanooptics have enabled us to considerably advance light control on the nanometer scale. Beyond the original peak of inflated expectation, the assets of nanooptics over other technologies, along with its limitations, became clearer. More recently, the field has entered into the slope of enlightenment in which its actual contribution to both basic research and novel technologies has been better identified. In this talk, following a general introduction on the main assets of nano-optics, we will review different aspects of our research where nano-optical resonators are used as an enabling technology that can benefit a wide range of scientific disciplines, all the way from reconfigurable planar optics to biotechnology.



 

 

Electro-Optic Metal-Oxides for Miniaturised Telecom and Sensing Devices

Rachel Grange
ETH Zurich, Department of Physics, Institute for Quantum Electronics, Optical Nanomaterial Group
Switzerland
 

Brief Bio
Since 2021, Rachel Grange is an associate professor in integrated optics and nanophotonics in the Department of Physics at ETH Zurich. She has been assistant professor at ETH Zurich since 2015. From 2011 to 2014, she was junior group leader at the Friedrich Schiller University in Jena, Germany. Her research covers top-down and bottom-up fabricated nanostructures with metal-oxides.


Abstract

Nonlinear and electro-optic devices are present in our daily life with many applications: light sources for microsurgery, green laser pointers, or modulators for telecommunication. Most of them use bulk materials such as glass fibres or high-quality crystals, hardly integrable or scalable due to low signal and difficult fabrication. Generating nonlinear or electro-optic effects from materials at the nanoscale can expand the applications to biology and optoelectronics. However, the efficiency of nanostructures is low due to their small volumes. 

Here I will show several strategies to enhance optical signals by engineering metal-oxides at the nanoscale with the goal of developing nonlinear and electro-optic photonics devices for a broad spectral range. We use metal-oxides such as barium titanate (BTO) and lithium niobate (LNO) as an alternative platform for nanoscale nonlinear photonics. Recently, we focused on bottom-up assemblies of BTO nanoparticles to obtain electro-optic metasurfaces and quasi phase matching effects (Fig.1). 

The field of metal-oxides at the nanoscale has a huge potential of applications in nanophotonics, integrated optics and telecommunication. 

Fig. 1: Schematic view of an assembly of BTO nanoparticles for Mie driven random quasi-phase-matching. (Savo et al. Nature Photonics 14, 740, 2020).

 



 

 

Topological Plasmonics: Ultrafast Vector Movies of Plasmonic Skyrmions on the Nanoscale

Harald Giessen
4. Physikalisches Institut, University of Stuttgart
Germany
 

Brief Bio
Harald Giessen (*1966) graduated from Kaiserslautern University with a diploma in Physics and obtained his M.S. and Ph.D. in Optical Sciences from the University of Arizona in 1995 as J.W. Fulbright scholar. After a postdoc at the Max-Planck-Institute for Solid State Research in Stuttgart he moved to Marburg as assistant professor. From 2001-2004, he was associate professor at the University of Bonn. Since 2005, he is full professor and holds the Chair for Ultrafast Nanooptics in the Department of Physics at the University of Stuttgart. He is also co-chair of the Stuttgart Center of Photonics Engineering, SCoPE. He was guest researcher at the University of Cambridge, and guest professor at the University of Innsbruck and the University of Sydney, at A*Star, Singapore, as well as at Beijing University of Technology. He is associated researcher at the Center for Disruptive Photonic Technologies at Nanyang Technical University, Singapore. He received an ERC Advanced Grant in 2012 for his work on complex nanoplasmonics. He was co-chair (2014) and chair (2016) of the Gordon Conference on Plasmonics and Nanophotonics. He was general chair of the conference Photonics Europe (Strasbourg 2018) and is co-chair of the biannual conference NanoMeta in Seefeld, Austria. He is on the advisory board of the journals "Advanced Optical Materials", "Nanophotonics: The Journal", "ACS Photonics", "ACS Sensors", and "Advanced Photonics". He is a topical editor for ultrafast nanooptics, plasmonics, and ultrafast lasers and pulse generation of the journal "Light: Science & Applications" of Nature Publishing Group. He is a Fellow of the Optical Society of America. In 2018, 2019, 2020 and 2021, he was named „Highly Cited Researcher“ (top 1%) by the Institute of Scientific Information. In 2021, he was elected as a Full Member into the Honor Society Sigma Xi. In 2021, he was awarded the Gips-Schüle Research Prize for his pioneering work on 3D printed microoptics. His research interests include Ultrafast Nano-Optics, Plasmonics, Metamaterials, 3D Printed Micro- and Nano-Optics, Medical Micro-Optics, Miniature Endoscopy, Novel mid-IR Ultrafast Laser Sources, Applications in Microscopy, Biology, and Sensing.


Abstract
Available soon.



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