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Keynote Lectures

Graphene and Layered Materials for Photonics and Optoelectronics
Andrea Ferrari, Cambridge Graphene Centre, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom

All-Optical Modulation via Metamaterials
Humeyra Caglayan, Tampere University, Finland

Synthesis and Applications of Plasmonic Nanostructures
Isabel Pastoriza-Santos, University of Vigo, Spain

Towards the Increase of Sensitivity and Resolution of Fabry-Perot Cavities
Susana Silva, INESC TEC, Portugal

 

Graphene and Layered Materials for Photonics and Optoelectronics

Andrea Ferrari
Cambridge Graphene Centre, University of Cambridge
United Kingdom
 

Brief Bio
Andrea Ferrari is Professor of nanotechnology at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of Pembroke College. He founded and directs the Cambridge Graphene Centre and the EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Graphene Technology. He chairs the management panel and is the Science and Technology Officer of the European Graphene Flagship. He is a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering, the American Physical Society, the Materials Research Society, the Institute of Physics, the Optical Society, the Royal Society of Chemistry, The European Academy of Sciences, the Academia Europaea, and he received numerous awards, such as the Royal Society Brian Mercer Award for Innovation, the Royal Society Wolfson Research Merit Award, the Marie Curie Excellence Award, the Philip Leverhulme Prize, The EU-40 Materials Prize. 


Abstract
Graphene and layered materials have great potential in photonics and optoelectronics, where the combination of their optical and electronic properties can be fully exploited, and the absence of a bandgap in graphene can be beneficial. The linear dispersion of the Dirac electrons in graphene enables ultra-wide-band tunability as well as gate controllable third-harmonic enhancement over an ultra-broad bandwidth, paving the way for electrically tuneable broadband frequency converters for optical communications and signal processing. Saturable absorption is observed as a consequence of Pauli blocking and can be exploited for mode-locking of a variety of ultrafast and broadband lasers. Graphene integrated photonics is a platform for wafer scale manufacturing of modulators, detectors and switches for next generation datacom and telecom. These functions can be achieved with graphene layers placed on top of optical waveguides, acting as passive light-guides, thus simplifying the current technology. Heterostructures based on layers of atomic crystals have properties different from those of their individual constituents and of their three dimensional counterparts. The combinations of such crystals in stacks can be used to design the functionalities of such heterostructures, that can be exploited in novel light emitting devices, such as single photon emitters, and tuneable light emitting diodes.



 

 

All-Optical Modulation via Metamaterials

Humeyra Caglayan
Tampere University
Finland
 

Brief Bio
Prof. Humeyra Caglayan is an associate professor of physics in the Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences at Tampere University and leads the Metaplasmonics group. She received her Ph.D. degree in Physics from Bilkent University, Turkey, in 2010, where she investigated the novel electromagnetic phenomena in metamaterials and plasmonic structures. After her Ph.D. studies, she worked as a postdoctoral scholar at the University of Pennsylvania. Her group (Metaplasmonics) focuses on engineering the fundamental interaction between light and matter at the nanometer scale for plasmonic and metamaterial-based devices. She is an H2020 ERC Starting Grant holder (2019-2023). 


Abstract
All-optical nano-switches and modulators operating at minimal energy consumption with extreme confinement, are highly desirable in nanophotonics for the development of efficient all-optical computing and processing devices.

In this keynote lecture, I will review the recent development of all-optical ultrafast switches and modulations based on metamaterials. Then, focus on the realization of the plasmonic analogue of the Enhancement of Index of Refraction (EIR) effect in quantum optics and demonstrate linear all-optical switching mechanism through a particular plasmonic metasurface. This is attributed to the coherent control of polarizability of nanoantennas by properly tailoring the phase, amplitude, and polarization of the control beam to achieve the unprecedented modulation strength of the signal beam at ultra-low power.



 

 

Synthesis and Applications of Plasmonic Nanostructures

Isabel Pastoriza-Santos
University of Vigo
Spain
 

Brief Bio
She is currently Assoc. Prof at CINBIO and Department of Physical Chemistry at Universidade de Vigo. Since 2012, she heads the Functional Nanobiomaterials Group. Her current interest involves the synthesis, assembly and surface modification of nanoparticles with unique properties as well as development of (multi)functional nanostructured materials and tools with applicability in nanoplasmonics, (bio)sensing, catalysis and biomedicine. 


Abstract
Over the years, colloidal plasmonic nanoparticles have emerged as important building blocks of modern nanoscience and nanotechnology to deal with a wide range of applications including electronics, energy, medicine, catalysis, biosensing, imaging and therapy. The unique optical properties of plasmonic nanostructures have led to the development of routes to synthesize metal nanoparticles with tailored size and morphology as well as to assemble them in a control maner. Assemblies of metal nanoparticles often exhibit collective properties, which are highly enhanced over those of the individual particles.
Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy is an ultrasensitive analytical technique that can be applied non-invasively for the detection and imaging of a wide range of biomolecules. SERS allows identification of the specific spectral fingerprint of a probe analyte in contact with a plasmonic nanostructure and its sensitivity can go as far as the single-molecule level. Importantly, SERS offers multiplexing capability, requires no sample preparation and provides high spatial resolution. 
In this communication, we report the fabrication of different plasmonic nanostructures and their applications in the field of sensing based on SERS.



 

 

Towards the Increase of Sensitivity and Resolution of Fabry-Perot Cavities

Susana Silva
INESC TEC
Portugal
 

Brief Bio
Susana Silva is graduated in Applied Physics from the University of Porto, Portugal. She received the Ph.D. degree in Physics at the University of Porto, Portugal, on optical fiber sensors for refractive index and gas sensing. She is currently an R&D Researcher at the Center for Applied Photonics at INESC TEC. In the last few years, S. Silva has published more than 60 papers in international journals. S. Silva received the prize for best PhD Theses in Optics and Photonics of 2013. Her field of expertise is the fabrication of optical fiber sensors for monitoring of physical parameters. Her current research interests are distributed acoustic sensing and optical fiber sensors for harsh environments.


Abstract
Fiber Fabry Perot cavities are very interesting interferometers due to their intrinsic fiber optic properties. As a small interferometer and multi-interference, it is allowed to easily control sensitivity or resolution of the sensors. This control can be done by means of the FP cavity size, ie, for a small cavity, the sensitivity is increased. On the other hand, using two FPs in series or in parallel, and using one as a reference, it allows the increase of sensitivity or resolution using the Vernier effect. Finally, the use of interrogation systems based on white light technique allows obtaining extremely high resolutions and performance. Currently it is under development an interrogation system that allows µK resolutions to be applied in aerospace applications.



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